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How to Get into a UK Law School as an International Student

How to Get into a UK Law School as an International Student

“When you became interested in law is less important than what sparked your interest”

UK universities are highly academically oriented. Regardless of which degree you choose, your academic record and ambition are arguably the most important factors universities will consider when selecting suitable candidates. This is certainly the case for law, a highly competitive and sought-after major. Therefore, make sure you address all the following points when preparing your application.

#1 - Can you explain why you are interested in law?

When you became interested in law is less important than what sparked your desire to study law at university. You might have been inspired by your parents or sibling practicing law, or by a mock trial you participated in, or by watching one of our "Millie’s Guide to" webinars/panels on law. Whatever it is, you have to be able to explain eloquently and intelligently why you are interested in pursuing law as your chosen major. You are also expected to cover this extensively in your UCAS personal statement.

#2 - Which school subjects have prepared you to study law at university?

This is possibly the second most important area to cover in your personal statement. First, you need to identify which subjects you are currently studying at school are relevant to studying law. Second, you should elaborate on the transferable skills you’ve gained from studying these subjects, and explain how these skills equipped you to the study of law. Most students find subjects such as English Language and Literature, Economics, History, and Politics to be highly relevant, mainly because they teach students how to write eloquent essays, construct evidence-based arguments, and process dense texts within a short period of time.

“Don’t just write a laundry list of what you are currently studying.”

Pro-tip: don’t just write a laundry list of what you are currently studying. Be sure to provide concrete examples, such as a project, piece of reading, or coursework that you have done for the subject and give an in-depth explanation of the skills you have acquired from these academic experiences.

#3 - Have you participated in any extracurricular activities (ECA) which have given you more relevant skills and experience?

Your ECAs are not the first thing universities will consider when selecting suitable candidates; however, if your ECAs are closely related to your major — for instance, if you’ve participated in Model United Nations (MUN), debate team, mock trials, or have done an internship at a law firm — then it’s a different story. As mentioned above, it’s important to provide concrete examples; describe your ECA, identify and discuss the transferable skills you have gained, and explain how these skills will help you become a successful law student.

“LNAT spaces are limited, so secure a seat ASAP before they all run out.”

#4 - Have you fulfilled the standardized test requirement?

Quite a few of the top law programmes in the UK (those at Oxford, LSE, KCL, and UCL, to name a few) require students to submit a set of LNAT scores alongside their UCAS application. LNAT spaces are limited, and many students register for the test every year. If you are planning on applying to Oxford to study law (meaning you must meet the extra early deadline of October 15!), then you need to secure an LNAT seat ASAP before they all run out! Make sure that you do ample practices online, and engage an experienced mentor if you find it helpful before taking the LNAT so you are familiar with the testing material.

Are you in need of some feedback on your law school application essay or personal statement? Millie’s 1:1 Writing Clinics with one of Millie’s dedicated writing coaches are here to help. Check out Focus Focus (our 1 essay option) and Two Birds With One Stone (2 essays option).